Tuesday, 30 May 2017

using G Suite to track student behaviour

Behaviour Tracking

We use Managebac, it is a great tool for IB schools. It does a lot of things that a good SMS (student management system) should do (attendance, planning, assignments, marking, messaging, reports etc). It was created by the IB, so it works with PYP, MYP and DP including tracking CAS.

Last year Managebac introduced their behaviour tracking module, which replaced their now defunct Intersis system. As a Managebac school we thought it would make sense to use their behaviour tracking, it is built into Managebac, managed by Managebac and we were told it would develop over time.

It did have a few weaknesses, one of them being that only teachers of particular students and administrators could enter behaviour reports and we couldn't control who could sees what information.

The Secondary school set up a system where teachers filled out a Google Form and then use the Data director for forms add on to email the report to the secretary who then input the data into Managebac. Emails also went to the head of grade and the head of student services. This system allowed anyone to enter a report about a student (even if they didn't teach them) and then have it stored on Managebac. There were still limits to who could view notes and no option to record their follow up actions. Because the behaviour tracking in Managbac was new, we were confident it would evolve to a more useful tool over time.

Elementary decided to wait and see what was going to happen with Managebac. They were not happy about having this information input by a person as it might be sensitive and errors could occur with cutting and pasting.

It has now been twelve months and the behaviour module in Managebac has not matured enough for our liking. We feel we need a common format for recording and accessing student behaviour incidents. I was tasked with exploring using G Suite to create our own behaviour tracking system.

The design Specifications included
  • It must be simple enough that someone else with a rudimentary knowledge of Google could fix it / build it / repair it if I wasn't around. That means no writing scripts or code (not that I could do that anyway)
  • any teacher/staff member in the school should be able to enter a behaviour report
  • email notifications to a variety of people, this will change depending on the grade level of the student.
  • the data should be safe (access should be limited to those who need it)
  • different teachers / admin will need different levels of access (i.e. grade 4 teachers see grade 4 students, Principal can see all reports)
  • we need to record a variety of notes and find a way to visualise this information
You can have a look at these view only versions of the sheets and docs if you want to see specifics of how they work and feel free to make your own copies and have a play.
Form
Student Data sheet
Form Responses sheet 
link to the behaviour reporting site

We started with the form that secondary use to record behaviour.

1. Creating drop down lists for all the students in the School
I knew we would want to filter reports, therefore I didn't want teachers to type in the names of the student they are making the report about. This could cause problems with filtering records if different teachers spell names differently or use different names for the same student. I decided a dropdown list was needed. To create the dropdown list I used the form ranger add on which allows you to create drop down questions from a list in a Google Sheet. (feel free to make your own copy to use with a google form)

I downloaded all the student data from ManageBac as a CSV file and then added it to a Google Sheet. Then used a query to sort the data into three different tabs, in the form we have three drop down questions rather than a single massive dropdown question. (this can be modified for as many questions as you like)


The advantage of this method is that we can change the data in the sheet and it automatically changes the form. That data can be easily downloaded and uploaded from Managebac or even manually added. We can also add homeroom teacher emails to the sheet (which is used later for the email notifications)

2. Adding Questions to the Google form
Then I added the rest of the questions we required to the google form, these can be anything at all. We chosen the following as we will want to track if certain areas, subjects or times cause more issues than others.
  • Location / subject
  • Date
  • Time
  • Behaviour type
  • Action taken by the teacher
  • Notes
I also added another question where administrators can add their responses (more about that later)

3. Email notifications
Once a staff member submits a behaviour report we want emails to go to particular individuals. Specifically all emails go to head of student services and the Principal, homeroom teachers get an email if there is a report about a student in their class.

To achieve this we use a combination of a few functions, Import rangeVlookup formula and query and the google sheets add ons  copy down and Form Mule

Step number one was to set up the form responses sheet to link students with their homeroom teachers.

In our original student list sheet we added homeroom teacher emails for each student, this wasn't as hard as it sounds, I filtered by class and then copied the teacher email address to each student. This can easily be done at the start of the school year for all students or when a new students arrives at school.

In our form responses  sheet I then created a new tab "students" and used the import range function to import student names and each students teacher into this tab.
Import range allows you import data from one sheet to another, that means if you update the original sheet "student data" the second sheet "form responses" also gets updated.

In a new column (column O) in the form responses sheet I then used the following Vlookup formula
which uses the data in a cell "N2" as a search term in the students tab (N2 is where the student names are located), it returns the data in the cell next to it (homeroom teacher email). This means that once a form is submitted a student name is searched for in the "students" tab and the data in the cell next to it (teacher email) is pasted in the cell. This email address is then used to send out the notifications. Here you can see where the effort of using drop down menus and form ranger comes to the fore. It keeps our data consistent and allows these types of systems to work.

This is a great way to search a list and add extra information to a google sheet that is linked to a form. The only issue is that when a new response is submitted Google Sheets inserts a new row, rather than pasting the data to a row. This means you can't copy and paste the formula all the way down the sheet. because of this I use the copy down add on, which copies the formula down to the next row each time a form is submitted.

Now that the data is ready I use form mule to automatically send an email when a new behaviour report (form) is submitted. Form mule can be set up to send emails to multiple addresses. We use a combination of the homeroom teacher email and the Principal / head of student services. This allows multiple people to receive the details of the behaviour incident. The email addresses can be put directly into the form mule template or they can be added to the sheet using the copy down formula and concatenate (to merge multiple cells together).

4. Access and searching behaviour reports
All of the behaviour reports are stored on a google sheet, this makes it easy to search for particular students, dates, locations etc. We can also generate reports and graphics about behaviour hot spots or times when we have more reports than others.

We also wanted this information to be easily available and searchable for admin members and teachers. It is also important to keep this data as private. For example grade 4 teachers should only see grade 4 students but Principals see all records. We also wanted this information to be easily on the eye.

To achieve this I set up a google site and then used Awesome Table to create cool embedded table into the site
Awesome table really is awesome, it allows you to choose columns from a Google Sheet and display them in a variety of formats. It also allows you to add a variety of search boxes, drop downs and sliders. This makes it really easy to search via date, class, or student name.

I created a new tab on the form responses sheet and used a query that only selected certain rows to create the information that needed to be shared. You can also change the order when using a query.
(here you can also see the types of filters I used for the awesome table)

In my example site the sheet is available for anyone on the internet to view, which we don't want when it comes to sensitive student data. We need a way to make the data private.

Because Awesome table uses a Google sheet all we have to do is change the permissions of the sheet so only certain people can view the sheet, that way if someone who we don't want to view the data tries, they will get an error message or the site wont display anything.

To set up grade level teachers with individual permissions I used the import range function to import all the data into a new sheet, then used a query (or even a filter) so that the only data on the sheet is limited to a certain grade, i.e. only grade four students are listed on the sheet. We then set up permissions so that only the grade four teachers can view that sheet, created a new Awesome table on a new page on the site. That way homeroom teachers can search for students in their homeroom but can not see any behaviour notes of other students.

5. Adding the ability to record the admin response.
This system also allows a response from the head of student services to be recorded. It could be recorded directly on the sheet but this is a bit messy and could be confusing for someone who is not tech savvy. I wanted to avoid data being changed or deleted. When creating these types of systems I think it as always best to limit the number of people who have access to the data.

To add their response it is much neater and easier for admin members to return to the original form and add their response there.

Whenever a google form is submitted, a url is generated that allows the user to go back and modify their response. You have probably seen the edit your response link / email you can get from a google form.
I used this script (available on line) which saves the edit URL to a cell in the response sheet. It took a little bit of fiddling, but is now working nicely. I have just realised that Form Mule will do this for you by simply clicking a box, so in future will be using this and saving myself a lot of hassle
I added an extra section to the form which is only for a member of admin to complete

To allow admin members to get back to the form and add their response I included a link to the edit URL in the Form Mule email. All the admin member has to do is find the original email and click on the link to go back to the form and easily add their response
This response is then recorder on the Google Sheet and can be viewed via the awesome table on the Google Site. There is also a link to the Site in the email body.

That is about it, everything is available via add ons, or simple formulas and hopefully this documentation should be clear enough that anyone else could duplicate it.

We will be testing the system next year and will be closely monitoring how it works, how easily it is maintained and is it is used. There are also plans to tweek it so it can be used in secondary. I will probably add grade level co-ordinators to the emails of students in their grade by adding them to teh student data sheet.

This is quite a long post but I wanted to try and make the entire system replicable (is that even a word) feel free to drop me an email or tweet if you have any questions or queries.




Friday, 19 May 2017

Bring your Art to life

Think Harry Potter and the talking Portraits from Hogwarts

Then think what if we had this in our classroom?

The How do I do this is easy?

It is how could I use this in my students learning that requires some thinking.

My first response is for FUN. Why not just do it for some laughs and while doing it the kids will also learn some tech skills and tools.

If you really need a curriculum based answer to "How can I use this in my class?", try this

The way our grade three team use it is to create talking images of body parts.

The students
1. researched a body system as part of their inquiry unit on healthy bodies
2. wrote a short report in the first person (as if they were that body part)
3. they then drew or found an image of the body part

4. they used Chatterpix or YaKit kids to create a talking picture. These Apps allow students to draw a mouth on an image and then record an audio track, when it is played back the mouth moves and the pictures comes to life. It is lots of fun and can be used to make any image or photo talk.


Here you can see the students created talking wanted posters for different types of Bacteria. It has so many uses for any subject area.

This video is saved to the camera roll and is then used as the overlay for our Aura (talking image - see the next section)

5. We then used the Aurasma app to bring the talking pictures to life.
Aurasma is an augmented reality app that can use any image (as long as it can read the image clearly) as a trigger to start a video or show a video. It is quite cool because it is an augmented reality app, that means the video floats over the top of a live view from the camera. (It adds something to reality)
In our case we have added a floating talking video to the live view. Basically we are bringing the still images to life just like the talking pictures in Harry Potter.

Sometimes Aurasma didn't like the original image, it couldn't recognise it clearly enough and the slider wouldn't move to the green zone.
To solve this we added some extra contrast to the trigger image, a name or extra diagram in thick black pen to make sure we got the slider in the green zone.

I know that many people complain about Aurasma being a bit complicated especially when it comes to channels and viewing other auras. One thing we do at school to make using Aurasma easier is to have all the iPads signed into a single Aurasma account, we can still have lots of channels, it just makes it a bit easier to get started and to get the kids using Aurasma.

There are heaps of how to use Aurasma tutorials on Youtube, Here is a quick (and a bit rough) tutorial on how to add a video from the camera roll (Chatterpix video) to a trigger image (still image or picture)

This was a huge hit with parents and students on student led conference day and during their body expo. The reality is that this same technique can be used in any subject.

Some other ways students and teachers could use this

  • use maths problems (as trigger images) on the wall and show videos of how to solve the problems (Explain everything + Aurasma)
  • use library book covers (as trigger images) and show student book review videos (Camera + Aurasma)
  • have a series of scenes from a well know story or student created story (as trigger images) and show students retell a story using puppet pals as the video (Puppet Pals + Aurasma)
  • use images of cells or bacteria (as trigger images) and show videos or stop motion movies explaining a scientific concept (Stop Motion + Aurasma)
  • use movie posters (as trigger images) and show videos of their drama performances (Camera + Aurasma)
  • use pictures of a PE activity (as the trigger image) and show a video of how to do the exercise (Camera + Aurasma)
  • use a picture of a landform or feature (as a trigger image) and show a video using tellagami and green screen of someone reporting from the scene (volcano exploding etc) or explaining the feature (Tellagami, green screen + Aurasma)
  • use an image of a country (as a trigger image) and show a 360 video (Quicktime, an iPad, Google streetview + Aurasma)
  • use images of musical instruments (as trigger images) and show videos of kids playing the instruments or explanation videos of what they are (camera, explain everything + Aurasma)
  • use text from another language (as a trigger image) and show videos of students translating it (Camera + Aurasma)
  • use recipes or images of food (as trigger images) and show videos of students making the recipes (Camera + Aurasma)
  • use student created poetry (as trigger images) and show videos of the students reading their poetry (iMovie + Aurasma)

There are so many different ways you can use this in any class.  Anything you can create on an iPad can be turned into an Aura.

I would love to hear any other ideas in the comment s below.





Sunday, 7 May 2017

Redesigning our learning spaces - the shark tank

Part 1 can be found here
Part 2 can be found here


What else can I say, the teams were


The be honest everything seemed a bit rushed, we asked the teams to meet in their own time and do some extra work, there was a weeks holidays and before we knew it the Shark Tank session was here. Would the groups be ready? Would their ideas be any good? What would the shark tank think? I know I was a bit nervous about the entire process.


To be honest I had nothing to worry about the teams were incredible, each of them had a different slant on their learning space, each of them did lots of work and they all presented their ideas creatively and professionally. One of the big pluses was that the teachers stepped back and let the students present.

The rules were as follows
The goal of the presentation is to sell your idea for your new learning space, remember we are trying to generate ideas for and there is every chance your ideas will be used.

There will be no winner, although if you want to claim bragging rights (and maybe be first in line for an innovative learning space) you will have to do a super job.

Each team will have a maximum of three minutes to pitch their idea to the shark tank, you will have access to a data projector, anything else you want to include (dance music, lifesize 3D models, treats) you will have to provide yourselves.

The shark tank will then have 1-2 minutes to deliberate then another 1-2 minutes to give feedback.

Each presentation and feedback will take 5-10 minutes, that way we should be finished by 4pm.

We will use a random draw for the order of presentations.

Team 1
The Drama room
Highlights
light and sound system
flexible seating
curved bench
portable stage
mirrors
chill out / cave areas


Team 2
Level 7 Design Room
Highlights
a stressless environment
sofa, bean bags - comfortable areas
air freshener
laptop tables / trays
standing long desk
basketball bin


Team 3
DP Lounge
Highlights
hands on interactive paper presentation
flexible multipurpose space
glass concertina doors
blinds
portable data projector 
effective use of space



Team 4
Level 6 Common Spaces
Highlights
flexible furniture
no clear path through the area
use of corners as social areas
TV / data projector to practise presentations etc
sound system
laptop charging cupboard
plants to look good and improve air quality
add extra ceiling fans for more natural cooling
have the same set up in two areas of the school


Team 5
Science Corridor

Highlights
turn the science hallway into a learning space
for many students it is the first part of the school they see every day
how can the hallway be brought to life
add nature to the hallway - fish / plants / incorporating art
find plants that need low light
a series of fishtanks where fish can travel from tank to tank in tubes like a series of cells
seating so people could hang out here and get some nature




What now?
The response from the Shark Tank and the other groups was overwhelming positive. The big questions everyone is asking is where to now? What is happening with these super ideas?

The Leadership team is very keen to move ahead with some of these ideas, their only question was how much consultation was done? Who was included? and Who else needs to be included?

So that is our next task, exploring some of these ideas and then consulting with more users and budget holders and then hopefully improving some of our learning spaces. It all looks very positive and lets hope is remains this way.

Of course once we have these super new learning spaces I will share them here.

Wednesday, 26 April 2017

Redesigning our learning spaces part II


In teams of teachers and students, we have been working through a process of collaboratively redesigning some of our learning spaces.

This is a five week process using the Stamford Design Thinking Process.

Our five steps / lessons / stages are
1. Introduction to the Stamford Design Process
2. Revisit the Process focussing on empathy and creating a problem / challenge statement
3. Work in teams to ideate a new learning space
4. Prepare the presentation / pitch of the new learning space
5. Pitch the learning space to a panel of peers and stakeholders

We have now completed stages 1 and 2 with most teams having created a challenge statement and sharing it on our shared Google Doc. The Challenge is to keep the energy flowing and the the good ideas bubbling to the top.


Week 3. Ideate a new learning space
We started by recapping what it means to work in a team, or more accurately asking the teams what are some of the things that need to happen so that their team works effectively. We used this video to start the discussion comparing good teamwork vs bad.
We spent some time explicitly addressing the power dynamic, i.e. a teacher leading or being part of the group and how could we overcome this so that everyone in the team had equal input. We also again went over our three metaphors for learning spaces and reminded everyone to focus on empathy and really listening to what people wanted in a learning space.
I provided the teams with a heap of resources and encouraged the teams to add their own resources.
Some of the resources included
Videos of how other schools have changed their learning spaces,WAB, Shekou and this playlist.
Then there is this great Flipboard Magazine from Tricia Friedman at UWC

Then it was time to work ideate, teams started exploring, playing and listening. I would have loved to be a part of every conversation and discussion. I did get the chance to flitter between groups and loved what I was hearing.


One group completely changed their plan for the science corridor after speaking to the science teachers. They wanted worm farms and other live animals, but they didn't think about who would look after them, now they want fish and plants, low maintenance and they clean their own tanks. It was so refreshing to see teachers and students listening more than they spoke.


I have a feeling the results are going to be great
Week 4
Preparing the pitch
We had plans to bring in an expert on presentations and share something presentation zen like, giving our students some tools and ideas. We ran out of time and to be honest couldn't find the right expert. Looks like we will just have to trust that our teachers and students have the right stuff when it comes to a Steve Jobs Style pitch.


We also wanted to maximise the time that the teams had working ideating their redesigns. We also guided / suggested / instructed the teams that they would want to probably meet again before next weeks Shark Tank.

Every team was so into the process that they were happy to meet in their own time, even after school and this is in a busy time of the school year, exams, athletics etc.

We have had lots of positive feedback about the process and most of all students and teachers appreciate being listened to, the big challenge will be to ensure that once we get these great ideas that something actually happens. It would be a disaster if all this collaboration and listening didn't lead to action.

Next week the Shark Tank, where our teams pitch their ideas to a group of critical friends.

Monday, 17 April 2017

Redesigning our Learning Spaces

Our Learning spaces at IGBIS need an update
 Even though we are a new school many of our classes still look like a classroom from 20 years ago. We don't have any really innovative teaching spaces. Some of our rooms including the library and art room are very cool, functional and flexible. 



Some of them are just plain drab and boring.

Learning spaces are something I have been thinking about a lot lately.  I have lots of ideas, I read lots of articles and have visited (and photographed) schools with innovative and cool learning spaces. hopefully we can  move forward with getting some 21st century learning spaces at IGBIS. The new boss is very receptive to looking at our learning spaces, after chatting with him we thought any redesign should be a collaborative process, including all stakeholders.  The challenge was how to go about collaborating to plan new learning spaces.

I attended a workshop at Learning 2 last year led by Victor Boulanger on using the Stanford Design Thinking Process in schools to solve problems. I also attended a session at Deep Learning (KL) on using the Design thinking Process to design curriculum. I also would have liked to attend this session by Sarah Phoenix at Deep Learning on learning spaces, but circumstances didn't allow it. While talking to a few people at school, we thought we would try using the design process with a group of students and teachers to plan some new learning spaces.

We invited interested staff and asked them to nominate two students each to form a working teams to redesign a learning space in the school. It could be a classroom, hall way or common area. We sold the process as a brainstorming process that could actually happen. We then planned out five sessions / workshops / working times

1. Introduction to the Stamford Design Process 
2. Revisit the Process focussing on empathy and creating a problem / challenge statement
3. Work in teams to ideate a new learning space
4. Prepare the presentation / pitch of the new learning space
5. Pitch the learning space to a panel of peers and stakeholders

These sessions are to be held during school lesson times and after school.

So far we have completed part 1 and 2

Session1
I gave a bit of content on what to look for when thinking about learning spaces including the three metaphors for learning spaces
For a more detailed explanation see this document from Thornburg campfires in cyberspace

Then using the crash course guide from the Stamford Design Process website, we worked through this document  in pairs with participants designing a new learning space. Participants had to pair up with someone who was not from their team.

It worked really well, this is the second time I have used this crash course with staff and the first time I used it with students, both time I was impressed with the response from the participants. I empathised the importance of the empathy stage multiple times. 




People really like being listened to and having just 3-4 minutes of someone really listening to you and focusing on your wants and needs is very empowering with lots of positive feedback from teachers and students.

We didn't finish the design process (we ran out of time) but the participants had a good introduction and got a feel for what was coming up.

Session 2
Revisit the Process focussing on empathy and creating a problem / challenge statement

Here we split into our teams one teacher and two students per team and used the same document to work through the design process.

We then revisited the three metaphors for learning spaces.
Each team chose a learning space that they wanted to change, they worked through the first two steps of the Design Process, Empathy and Define.

Here teams interviewed each other and then chose a few other people (outside of the team) to interview with the intention of really empathising with the client (person they were interviewing). We gave them a list of open ended questions and emphasised the point of telling stories and listening. They then had to generate their problem / challenge statement and bring it to the next session.
This was a shortened session, but there was a lot of passion and energy once the teams finally picked a learning space (one team we had to guide and offer suggestions for their learning space). We could have done with more time but teams really started to get a feel for what sort of things   

Next week we will be researching and working in our teams to start designing our new learning spaces.

We have made lots of progress and the design process is working well, it gives us a structure and a way to collaborate where everyone is an equal (can sometimes be hard when students work with teachers) and gives us focus for our end product.